Town Hall introduces four candidates vying for LaMalfa’s seat Voters pack the Women's Club to question candidates

Ali Meders Knight
Ali Meders-Knight

Several hundred people filled the Chico Women’s Club on Jan. 27 for The People’s Candidate Town Hall, where four candidates running for the seat of Rep. Doug LaMalfa participated in a forum. Ali Meders-Knight, a member of the Mechoopda tribe, opened the forum, calling for “ethical treatment of the environment” and reminding the audience that indigenous tribes maintained the region’s ecosystem successfully for thousands of years.

Louis Elbinger
Image is not available

Lewis Elbinger, a Green Party candidate, said we should combine "indigenous wisdom" with the best modern technology. Protecting the Dreamers, he said, is a "no-brainer" and Trump supporters who feel threatened should be engaged in dialogue. Check out his Facebook page here.

Audrey Denney
Image is not available

Audrey Denney, a Democrat, said police violence is a “problem of impunity" and officers should be prosecuted in cases of fatal shootings. She also said she would eliminate federal crop subsidies and work for a “farm policy that makes sense for all farmers.” Check out her website here.

Marty Walters
Image is not available

Marty Walters, a Democrat, responded to a question about police violence by noting that the federal government doesn’t regulate local law enforcement agencies. But she added that through training programs the “culture of policing can be changed.” Her website can be viewed here.

Image is not available

Jessica Holcombe, a Democrat, said she’s a “huge advocate of Medicare for all,” adding, “We’re the only developed nation that doesn’t provide some form of universal health care for its citizens.” Eliminating the role of private insurance companies could lead to substantial savings, she said. Her website is here. Slideshow photos by Karen Laslo, reporting by Leslie Layton.

Arrow
Arrow
Slider

Congressman leads rally to repeal gas tax Protesters call the rally a "publicity stunt"

photo by Leslie Layton

Protesters surrounded a Jan. 26 rally led by Congressman Doug LaMalfa, Sen. Jim Nielsen and Assemblyman James Gallagher to oppose the gas tax repeal campaign and LaMalfa's policies in general.

Plan to hike water delivery to farms ripped Speakers say fish harmed if more water goes south

photo by Dave Waddell

Rick Switzer

by Dave Waddell

The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation came to Chico State to get public reaction to its vague new proposal to “maximize” water deliveries from the north to San Joaquin Valley farmers. The reviews from most of the two dozen or so people speaking Thursday were overwhelmingly and passionately against the notion, as well as frequently distrustful of the federal agency.

“How much harder can you twist the sponge that is already quite dry?” asked Rick Switzer. “Someone should carry the message to them that we’re all out. … Water is finite. You people do not seem to be familiar with the concept.” read more

Women’s March on Chico draws thousands Range of issues addressed by planning team and participants

Image is not available

The Women's March on Chico 2018.

The Women's March on Chico 2018 took place on Saturday, Jan. 20, and crowd-size estimates ranged from 5,000 to 7,000.

The Women's March on Chico 2018 took place on Saturday, Jan. 20, and crowd-size estimates ranged from 5,000 to 7,000.

Image is not available

Ali Meders-Knight (fist in the air), a member of the Mechoopda tribe, provided an opening address.

Ali Meders-Knight (fist in the air), a member of the Mechoopda tribe, provided a welcome address and pressed for attention to the problem of unresolved crimes affecting indigenous women (#MMIW.)

Ali Meders-Knight (fist in the air), a member of the Mechoopda tribe, provided a welcome address and pressed for attention to the problem of unresolved crimes affecting indigenous women (#MMIW.)

Image is not available

The women's march was put together by a diverse team of women.

The women's march was put together by a diverse team of women representing cultural and community organizations and the group that organized the huge 2017 march.

The women's march was put together by a diverse team of women representing cultural and community organizations and the group that organized the huge 2017 march.

Image is not available

The march drew many who called for protection for young immigrant adults.

The march drew many who called for protection for young immigrant adults, and took place on the first day of a federal government shutdown over the budget and immigration.

The march drew many who called for protection for young immigrant adults, and took place on the first day of a federal government shutdown over the budget and immigration.

Image is not available

Many of the women at the march condemned language that's been used by President Trump in reference to women and some called on women to run for office.

Many of the women at the march condemned language that's been used by President Trump in reference to women and some called on women to run for office.

Many of the women at the march condemned language that's been used by President Trump in reference to women and some called on women to run for office.

Image is not available

Ann Byrns of Butte Valley wore her Pussy Power poncho to the march, which she had worn to the 2017 Women's March on Washington.

Ann Byrns of Butte Valley wore her Pussy Power poncho to the march, which she had worn to the 2017 Women's March on Washington.

Ann Byrns of Butte Valley wore her Pussy Power poncho to the march, which she had worn to the 2017 Women's March on Washington.

Image is not available

Ashley G. Miller confronted a young man holding an offensive sign.

Ashley G. Miller confronted a young man standing at the northeastern corner of Downtown Plaza waving a sign targeting women with vulgar language.

Ashley G. Miller confronted a young man standing at the northeastern corner of Downtown Plaza waving a sign targeting women with vulgar language.

Arrow
Arrow
Slider

Move the Junkyard group pleased with court ruling But citizen activists are frustrated by city's response

photo by Karen Laslo

Attorney Jim McCabe, Chico City Councilmember Karl Ory and attorney Richard Harriman persuaded a North Butte County Superior Court judge that a referendum on Chico Scrap Metal should go forward during a Jan. 16 hearing on a lawsuit filed by the city. But later Tuesday, the City Council voted to appeal the judge's ruling. The referendum would give Chicoans a chance to vote on an ordinance that allows the scrap metal recycling business to stay on East 20th Street near a residential neighborhood. "We were successful," said Adrienne Edwards, who worked with the Move the Junkyard group, "but the city is going to pour more money down the drain to appeal the judge's decision."

“We need to get home” A U.S. veteran assists other vets deported to Mexico

Héctor Barajas opened what has become a resource center and shelter for U.S. veterans who have been deported to Mexico, often because of convictions for non-violent crimes. He tells his story — and the story of many other legal U.S. residents who served in this country’s military — in this video produced by ChicoSol contributor Erik Aguilar. Learn more about the Deported Veterans Support House by visiting its website or Facebook page.