Saturday Peace Vigil targets gun violence After Parkland school shooting, vigil participants protest NRA

photo by Karen Laslo

Members of the Feb. 17 Chico Peace Vigil held every Saturday downtown hold protest signs in the wake of the latest mass shooting at a high school in Parkland, Fla. Former student Nikolas Cruz used a semiautomatic rifle to kill 17 people on Feb. 14.

Women’s March on Chico draws thousands Range of issues addressed by planning team and participants

Image is not available

The Women's March on Chico 2018.

The Women's March on Chico 2018 took place on Saturday, Jan. 20, and crowd-size estimates ranged from 5,000 to 7,000.

The Women's March on Chico 2018 took place on Saturday, Jan. 20, and crowd-size estimates ranged from 5,000 to 7,000.

Image is not available

Ali Meders-Knight (fist in the air), a member of the Mechoopda tribe, provided an opening address.

Ali Meders-Knight (fist in the air), a member of the Mechoopda tribe, provided a welcome address and pressed for attention to the problem of unresolved crimes affecting indigenous women (#MMIW.)

Ali Meders-Knight (fist in the air), a member of the Mechoopda tribe, provided a welcome address and pressed for attention to the problem of unresolved crimes affecting indigenous women (#MMIW.)

Image is not available

The women's march was put together by a diverse team of women.

The women's march was put together by a diverse team of women representing cultural and community organizations and the group that organized the huge 2017 march.

The women's march was put together by a diverse team of women representing cultural and community organizations and the group that organized the huge 2017 march.

Image is not available

The march drew many who called for protection for young immigrant adults.

The march drew many who called for protection for young immigrant adults, and took place on the first day of a federal government shutdown over the budget and immigration.

The march drew many who called for protection for young immigrant adults, and took place on the first day of a federal government shutdown over the budget and immigration.

Image is not available

Many of the women at the march condemned language that's been used by President Trump in reference to women and some called on women to run for office.

Many of the women at the march condemned language that's been used by President Trump in reference to women and some called on women to run for office.

Many of the women at the march condemned language that's been used by President Trump in reference to women and some called on women to run for office.

Image is not available

Ann Byrns of Butte Valley wore her Pussy Power poncho to the march, which she had worn to the 2017 Women's March on Washington.

Ann Byrns of Butte Valley wore her Pussy Power poncho to the march, which she had worn to the 2017 Women's March on Washington.

Ann Byrns of Butte Valley wore her Pussy Power poncho to the march, which she had worn to the 2017 Women's March on Washington.

Image is not available

Ashley G. Miller confronted a young man holding an offensive sign.

Ashley G. Miller confronted a young man standing at the northeastern corner of Downtown Plaza waving a sign targeting women with vulgar language.

Ashley G. Miller confronted a young man standing at the northeastern corner of Downtown Plaza waving a sign targeting women with vulgar language.

Arrow
Arrow
Slider

Move the Junkyard group pleased with court ruling But citizen activists are frustrated by city's response

photo by Karen Laslo

Attorney Jim McCabe, Chico City Councilmember Karl Ory and attorney Richard Harriman persuaded a North Butte County Superior Court judge that a referendum on Chico Scrap Metal should go forward during a Jan. 16 hearing on a lawsuit filed by the city. But later Tuesday, the City Council voted to appeal the judge's ruling. The referendum would give Chicoans a chance to vote on an ordinance that allows the scrap metal recycling business to stay on East 20th Street near a residential neighborhood. "We were successful," said Adrienne Edwards, who worked with the Move the Junkyard group, "but the city is going to pour more money down the drain to appeal the judge's decision."

Five reports to ‘Documenting Hate’ sidebar to "Chico cop defends 'Black Friday Matters' sign

by Leslie Layton

The complaint about the Down Range “Black Friday Matters” billboard was one of five that has so far been submitted to the Documenting Hate database from Butte County. Four other reports were made on use of racist epithets and stereotyping.

Here’s a summary:

  • A flier at Chico State was defaced shortly after the 2016 presidential election with white supremacist symbols;
  • A Latina in Chico says she was called a “wetback;”
  • A Chico teacher reported that her son was riding his bike to school when a car pulled up next to him and someone shouted, “Fuck you, Jew boy.”
  • An Oroville man reported that someone was overheard saying of him, “That’s a Muslim right there.” On the report submitted to the database, the man wrote, “… I have never felt like I don’t belong here as I do now. Since the beginning of 2016, people look at me differently… I wish things were different.” In a telephone interview, the man said he has Arab ancestry, is a U.S. military veteran and was raised as a Christian. He asked not to be identified. He said the shift in how he’s perceived by strangers is hard to “quantify” but palpable.
  • read more

    Professor’s new book chronicles challenges Son’s autism transforms path to a dream teaching job

    photo courtesy of Denise Minor

    Denise Minor and son Max

    by Dave Waddell and Leslie Layton

    Denise Minor had a dream that wouldn’t go away, a dream to teach Spanish at a university. And while it ultimately became a dream achieved at Chico State, it was first a dream deferred by the extreme challenges of mothering an autistic son.

    Minor, an associate professor in CSU, Chico’s department of international languages, literatures and cultures, chronicles her story in a new book, “No Screaming Jelly Beans: Trying to Pursue a Career While Raising a Son With Autism.

    Minor’s new book includes essays published in different forms and at different times during son Max’s life. She believes she benefited from her work on “No Screaming Jelly Beans” — even beyond the therapeutic value that can come from writing narratives — after the notion of a book took hold in her mind. read more

    Chicoans pack meeting to discuss homeless City Council will consider moving the Jesus Center

    Bill Such

    photos by Karen Laslo

    The Chico City Council voted unanimously Tuesday to consider moving the Jesus Center and consolidating services to the homeless in southeast Chico. But Chicoans packed the meeting, some in favor of the plan, some opposed and some warning that the homeless shouldn’t be merely shuttled from downtown unless more services will be provided.

    Bill Such, former Jesus Center executive director, said he fears the move could “compromise the identity” of the center. Such compared the homeless to Jesus of Nazarene, who he said was “intentionally homeless” and rejected by his family. “In Christian terms, Jesus, with nowhere to rest, is the homeless god,” Such said. read more