Butte County supervisors oppose sanctuary County takes sides in fight between state and Trump administration

photo by Leslie Layton

Dave Garcia, Chris Nelson and Julie Garza-Withers protested the board’s vote.

by Leslie Layton

The Butte County Board of Supervisors voted unanimously Tuesday to oppose California’s sanctuary law, passing a resolution that opposes state policy on immigration and recognizes federal government authority.

Supervisors voted 5-0 in favor of a political statement, a resolution that contends that the sanctuary law places “restrictions and limitations” on the Butte County Sheriff’s Office that could have a “potentially negative impact on public safety.”

The resolution, which escaped the notice of most media outlets and the public, acknowledges the Trump administration’s lawsuit against the state of California and says the administration could attempt to withhold federal grants from “jurisdictions that violate federal law” by prohibiting collaboration with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). read more

“We need to get home” A U.S. veteran assists other vets deported to Mexico

Héctor Barajas opened what has become a resource center and shelter for U.S. veterans who have been deported to Mexico, often because of convictions for non-violent crimes. He tells his story — and the story of many other legal U.S. residents who served in this country’s military — in this video produced by ChicoSol contributor Erik Aguilar. Learn more about the Deported Veterans Support House by visiting its website or Facebook page.

Migrant Ed students present to BCOE A summer institute changes lives

by Leslie Layton

Five teenagers from this area who have participated recently in Migrant Education summer leadership programs described a transformational experience in presentations Monday to the Butte County Office of Education board.

Migrant Ed student presentations

Oct. 16 Butte County Office of Education board meeting

Marco Antonio Villa Cruz

"One of the most interesting things I learned was about how Martin Luther King fought for the freedom of African Americans. He wanted a new way of living and he believed we could do it."

Angel Barrera

The 14-year-old Gridley student visited sites in Washington, D.C., including, he said, the Thomas Jefferson Memorial, Marine Corps War Memorial and Lincoln Memorial.

Noemi Chavez

"I was forced to get out of my comfort zone and make friends."

Victor Jimenez

He couldn't get into the flamenco guitar elective, because it was full, but liked theater "even better."

Janet Velazquez

"My parents work their butts off and I have to make them proud."

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Noemi Chavez, a Gridley High School senior, said the Migrant Student Leadership Institute (MSLI) program at California State University, Sacramento (CSUS), “taught me how to be myself.”

“Three or four years ago, I never would have said I was born in Mexico,” Chavez told the board. “MSLI taught me not to hide where I came from. It gave us hope. Now I’m applying to college.” read more

Dreamers worry Trump could end DACA Republican leaders urge Trump to act by Sept. 5

La Opinión photo courtesy of NAM

by Gabriel Sandoval

Aldo is worried, indeed afraid, that President Donald Trump may soon end or phase out a federal deportation-relief program, making it harder for him to live, work and study in the United States.

“My plan of getting my master’s, my plan of getting my doctorate, now looks very unrealistic,” said Aldo, a senior anthropology major at Chico State who requested that ChicoSol omit his last name.

Aldo is one of nearly 800,000 immigrants who benefit from the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, which grants temporary deportation relief, work permits and Social Security numbers to law-abiding people who were brought to the country illegally as children. read more

Red Bluff man fights deportation Immigration raids rattle North State communities

by Leslie Layton and Kate Sheehy

Sandra Jimenez never expected that she’d have to visit her husband in 30-minute spells at an Elk Grove jailhouse. Or that only a few days after their one-year wedding anniversary, he would be fighting deportation and she would be wondering whether she’d have to leave her country — the United States — to be with him.

But that’s where it stands after the operation conducted last week by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) in rural Northern California. Jimenez’s husband, Oscar Oseguera, 26, was detained by ICE officials March 21 as he left his Tehama County apartment in Red Bluff at daybreak to report to his job at a Driscoll strawberry plant. read more

North state raids on immigrant communities underway ICE plans to be in area for a week

by Dave Waddell

Federal immigration officials recently briefed the sheriffs of three counties – Shasta, Tehama and Glenn – on north state raids that are expected to last about a week, Glenn County Sheriff Rich Warren said today.

Warren said raids by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) were supposed to start three days ago and were expected to continue for several more days. He said he has not been informed about any arrests in Glenn County, nor was he aware of any bookings of immigrants at the county jail.

Warren said the sheriffs were assured by ICE that the only immigrants to be arrested would be those for which a criminal warrant had been issued. read more