Women’s March on Chico draws thousands Range of issues addressed by planning team and participants

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The Women's March on Chico 2018.

The Women's March on Chico 2018 took place on Saturday, Jan. 20, and crowd-size estimates ranged from 5,000 to 7,000.

The Women's March on Chico 2018 took place on Saturday, Jan. 20, and crowd-size estimates ranged from 5,000 to 7,000.

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Ali Meders-Knight (fist in the air), a member of the Mechoopda tribe, provided an opening address.

Ali Meders-Knight (fist in the air), a member of the Mechoopda tribe, provided a welcome address and pressed for attention to the problem of unresolved crimes affecting indigenous women (#MMIW.)

Ali Meders-Knight (fist in the air), a member of the Mechoopda tribe, provided a welcome address and pressed for attention to the problem of unresolved crimes affecting indigenous women (#MMIW.)

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The women's march was put together by a diverse team of women.

The women's march was put together by a diverse team of women representing cultural and community organizations and the group that organized the huge 2017 march.

The women's march was put together by a diverse team of women representing cultural and community organizations and the group that organized the huge 2017 march.

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The march drew many who called for protection for young immigrant adults.

The march drew many who called for protection for young immigrant adults, and took place on the first day of a federal government shutdown over the budget and immigration.

The march drew many who called for protection for young immigrant adults, and took place on the first day of a federal government shutdown over the budget and immigration.

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Many of the women at the march condemned language that's been used by President Trump in reference to women and some called on women to run for office.

Many of the women at the march condemned language that's been used by President Trump in reference to women and some called on women to run for office.

Many of the women at the march condemned language that's been used by President Trump in reference to women and some called on women to run for office.

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Ann Byrns of Butte Valley wore her Pussy Power poncho to the march, which she had worn to the 2017 Women's March on Washington.

Ann Byrns of Butte Valley wore her Pussy Power poncho to the march, which she had worn to the 2017 Women's March on Washington.

Ann Byrns of Butte Valley wore her Pussy Power poncho to the march, which she had worn to the 2017 Women's March on Washington.

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Ashley G. Miller confronted a young man holding an offensive sign.

Ashley G. Miller confronted a young man standing at the northeastern corner of Downtown Plaza waving a sign targeting women with vulgar language.

Ashley G. Miller confronted a young man standing at the northeastern corner of Downtown Plaza waving a sign targeting women with vulgar language.

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Move the Junkyard group pleased with court ruling But citizen activists are frustrated by city's response

photo by Karen Laslo

Attorney Jim McCabe, Chico City Councilmember Karl Ory and attorney Richard Harriman persuaded a North Butte County Superior Court judge that a referendum on Chico Scrap Metal should go forward during a Jan. 16 hearing on a lawsuit filed by the city. But later Tuesday, the City Council voted to appeal the judge's ruling. The referendum would give Chicoans a chance to vote on an ordinance that allows the scrap metal recycling business to stay on East 20th Street near a residential neighborhood. "We were successful," said Adrienne Edwards, who worked with the Move the Junkyard group, "but the city is going to pour more money down the drain to appeal the judge's decision."

“We need to get home” A U.S. veteran assists other vets deported to Mexico

Héctor Barajas opened what has become a resource center and shelter for U.S. veterans who have been deported to Mexico, often because of convictions for non-violent crimes. He tells his story — and the story of many other legal U.S. residents who served in this country’s military — in this video produced by ChicoSol contributor Erik Aguilar. Learn more about the Deported Veterans Support House by visiting its website or Facebook page.

Chico PD to get pilot mobile crisis counselors Mental health workers to aid cops 10 hours a day

Dorian Kittrell

by Dave Waddell

A pilot project is in the works that will provide the Chico Police Department – criticized for its lack of crisis intervention efforts in the past – with two mobile mental health counselors to work alongside police officers 10 hours a day.

The program is described in a Nov. 27 memorandum, written by Butte County Department of Behavioral Health Director Dorian Kittrell to the county Board of Supervisors and obtained by ChicoSol.

Kittrell said his department is working on a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with Chico PD to assign two full-time mental health workers to the pilot mobile crisis response team, which will operate seven days a week from about 8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. read more

Tax bill draws protesters to LaMalfa’s office District 1 congressman targeted by protesters opposed to GOP bill

photo by Karen Laslo

About 75 people showed up to protest the GOP tax bill Tuesday at the Oroville office of Congressman Doug LaMalfa. Protesters organized by the Democratic Action Club of Chico and other groups came from Chico, Oroville, Rocklin, Quincy and other towns, arguing that the bill will cut taxes for the wealthy and raise taxes for the middle class.

Sexual misconduct reports on rise at CSUC Campus equity chief: More women coming forward

Dylan Saake

by Gabriel Sandoval

As the nation reckons with a steady stream of stories about high-profile men accused of sexual misconduct, women are sharing their own stories on social media using the hashtag #MeToo.

The movement toward reporting and confronting sexual misconduct has for years been gaining momentum on college campuses. Today, many students are comfortable reporting sexual violence, says Dylan Saake, Chico State’s coordinator for compliance with the federal gender-equity law known as Title IX. To be in compliance, colleges must provide students safe learning environments, free of gender-based discrimination, and respond promptly and equitably if sexual misconduct is reported. read more